Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine strongly protect us from colds and flu

24 September, 2013 at 07:42 | Posted in Body & Mind, Chinese culture | Leave a comment
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By Melissa Sokulski
http://www.Natrualnews.com

Cold and flu season is upon us. Traditional Chinese Medicine has effective time-tested techniques which boost immunity and protect us from colds or the flu. Points can be needled and herbal formulas can be given to balance the body’s energy, strengthen the body and even speed recovery if one does come down with symptoms.

In Chinese medicine colds and flu are considered to be an external pathogen invading the body. When our body`s energy, or qi, is strong we are able to fight off these pathogens. If our qi is weak we come down with symptoms of cold and flu: headache, chills, fever, body aches, cough, and sore throat.

To keep our qi strong and prevent colds and flu it is important to:

  • Eat a healthy diet full of fresh raw fruits and vegetables.
  • Cut out white and brown sugar, and corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup – all of which lower our immunity.
  • Wash hands frequently with regular soap and water.
  • Get outside in fresh air exposing your face to sunshine. It may be wise to supplement with vitamin D3 this time of year.
  • Receive acupuncture treatments which strengthen the qi and balance energy.
  • Choose herbal medicine, supplements and nourishing food to keep immunity strong.

It is important to make sure all meridians are balanced to keep the energy flowing smoothly and our immunity strong. Immunity relates especially to the earth and metal elements which show up in the pulse as the spleen and lung meridians.

An acupuncturist will often use points such as Stomach 36 to keep the energy strong and Spleen 6 to make sure food is digested properly and nutrients are absorbed and turned into vital energy.

Large Intestine 11 is a powerful immune point. Large Intestine 4 and Triple Warmer 5 are often used to help the body push pathogens out. Lung 7 combined with Large Intestine 4 strengthens the body`s defense against pathogens.

Often the earth and metal points on the back (Bladder 13 and Bladder 20) are needled to harmonize the body`s energy and strengthen immunity.

In terms of herbal medicine:

  • Astragalus is an excellent immune tonic.
  • Medicinal mushrooms such as Reishi and Maitake can boost the immune system especially if compromised.
  • Four Gentlemen Formula is a classic Chinese herb formula to keep the qi strong.
  • Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang is a combination of ginseng, astragalus, and other herbs used to strengthen qi.

If someone comes down with symptoms of the flu the treatment switches to formulas which expel the pathogen:

  • Yin Qiao contains cooling detoxifying herbs such as forsythia and honeysuckle. It is used with symptoms of sore throat, headache, and a yellow tongue coat.
  • Gan Mao Ling is used when in the midst of a bad cold or flu especially with head and body aches.

Acupuncture and Chinese medicine have been around for thousands of years successfully treating many disorders including colds and flu.

Originally published by http://www.naturalnews.com and republished with permission
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/031540_influenza_Chinese_Medicine.html#ixzz2egYYYn1h

via Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine strongly protect us from colds and flu » The Epoch Times

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