37 Million Bees Found Dead In Ontario, Canada After Planting Large GMO Corn Field

23 November, 2014 at 07:33 | Posted in animals, Body & Mind, Environmental issues, Food, health, Science, Society, sustainable development | Leave a comment
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Organic Health

Millions of bees dropped dead after GMO corn was planted few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada. The local bee keeper, Dave Schuit who produces honey in Elmwood lost about 37 million bees which are about 600 hives.

“Once the corn started to get planted our bees died by the millions,” Schuit said. While many bee keepers blame neonicotinoids, or “neonics.” for colony collapse of bees and many countries in EU have banned neonicotinoid class of pesticides, the US Department of Agriculture fails to ban insecticides known as neonicotinoids, manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc.

Two of Bayer’s best-selling pesticides, Imidacloprid and Clothianidin, are known to get into pollen and nectar, and can damage beneficial insects such as bees. The marketing of these drugs also coincided with the occurrence of large-scale bee deaths in many European countries and the United States.

Nathan Carey another local farmer says that this spring he noticed that there were not enough bees on his farm and he believes that there is a strong correlation between the disappearance of bees and insecticide use.

Read more: 37 Million Bees Found Dead In Ontario, Canada After Planting Large GMO Corn Field | Organic Health

My comment: I once saw a television program about the death of bees, and there it said that one drop of dew from a GMO plant in a GMO crop field kills a bumble bee when it drinks it in the morning (as bumble bees usually do…). GMO really kills…

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Australian Scientists Find Plastic’s Toxic Footprint at Molecular Level

4 October, 2014 at 07:22 | Posted in animals, Body & Mind, Environmental issues, health, Nature, sustainable development | Leave a comment
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By Shar Adams
Epoch Times

SYDNEY—California has become the newest region to ban lightweight plastic bags, joining four states and territories in Australia in restricting the use of disposable plastics. The move comes as Australian researchers study the toxicity of plastics, which are polluting the marine environment at a molecular level.

The Californian ban was signed into law on Sept 30, making plastic bags in grocery stores and pharmacies prohibited from July 1, 2015, with convenience and liquor stores to follow a year later.

In Australia, non-biodegradable lightweight plastic bags are banned in Tasmania, South Australia, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory, but the legislation does permit the use of compostable, bio-degradable bags.

While the bans on bags represent important progress, researchers are finding the threat of plastics goes deeper than the disposable products we can see. Professor Richard Banati from the the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) says the full lifecycle of plastic is not yet understood and its degradability is questionable, particularly when litter is left to float in oceans.

The present paradigm is “the solution to pollution is dilution” but his research indicates otherwise.

“Dilution has its limits,” he said in a phone interview.

Beyond the Visible

There is no doubt that on a visible pollution level plastic is a huge problem. Scientists have found evidence of plastics choking or smothering many marine animals and ecosystems.

In a report released last month, Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) found plastic constituted most of the rubbish floating along Australia’s coastline, with densities ranging between a few thousand pieces of plastic per square kilometre to more than 40,000 pieces.

“About three-quarters of the rubbish along the coast is plastic,” said CSIRO scientist Denise Hardesty after collating data from survey sites every 100 km along the Australian coastline. “Most is from Australian sources, not the high seas, with debris concentrated near cities.”

Professors Banati’s work, however, looks beyond the visible. Using nuclear scientific methods he is examining a more insidious interaction – plastic contamination at the molecular level.

Following the results of an earlier collaboration with biologist Dr Jennifer Lavers, who was researching plastic in shearwater birds, the two scientists found that when plastic interacts with sea water, it absorbs heavy metals, becoming more toxic as it degrades. Looking at shearwater feathers at the molecular level they have identified the presence of plastic particles.

“Micro plastic particles are perfectly bite sized pieces for things like krill, zoo plankton, filter feeders and all of the marine creatures at the very base of the marine food web,” Dr Laver said.

Professor Banati is now collecting a larger sample for further research, conducting his own survey from Hobart to Sydney Harbour.

His aim is to identify the full life cycle of plastic, its impact on marine life and the food chain.

The forensic method, he said, will make plastic traceable and in that respect make producers and consumers accountable.

It is the increasing use of plastic on a mass level that is the concern. Identifying the full life cycle of plastic will allow for a better understanding for industry and government of how and when it can best be used.

“Traceability will allow us to make policy decisions,” he said.

via Australian Scientists Find Plastic’s Toxic Footprint at Molecular Level

Elephant Raju Weeps With Gratitude As He Is Released From 50 Years In Shackles

9 July, 2014 at 12:03 | Posted in Animal welfare, animals | Leave a comment
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Press People – Huffington Post

An elephant who was cruelly kept in spiked shackles for 50 years has been released.

Held in chains, beaten, abused and living on handouts from passing tourists, Raju was a pitiful sight on the streets of India.

Day after day he was forced to hold out his trunk, begging for a few coins and was often left so hungry he’d eat plastic and paper to fill his empty stomach.

But last week a North London-based charity Wildlife SOS stepped in to save Raju.

During the daring midnight rescue, which saw the beast finally freed on 4 July, tears were seen rolling down his noble face, as if he was weeping with gratitude.

Spokesman Pooja Binepal said: “Raju has spent the past 50 years living a pitiful existence in chains 24 hours a day, an act of intolerable cruelty. The team were astounded to see tears roll down his face during the rescue. It was so incredibly emotional for all of us. We knew in our hearts he realised he was being freed.

“Elephants are not only majestic, but they are highly intelligent animals, who have been proven to have feelings of grief, so we can only imagine what torture half a century has been like for him.

Read more: Elephant Raju Weeps With Gratitude As He Is Released From 50 Years In Shackles VIDEO, PICTURES

The Incredible Story of How Leopard Diabolo Became Spirit

5 April, 2014 at 08:57 | Posted in Animal welfare, animals, Body & Mind, Spirituality | Leave a comment


The incredible story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit – Anna Breytenbach, “animal communicator”.

This is a very touching story about an angry and sad black panther who had been badly treated in the zoo where he previously had been. See the heartwarming story of a miraculous transformation to a much more healthy black panther and hear his story.

Dog Breeds: What Does Your Choice of Breed Say About You?

23 February, 2014 at 16:49 | Posted in animals, Body & Mind, Funny things :-), Science | Leave a comment
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By Tara MacIsaac
Epoch Times

Here’s a look at what your dog’s breed may say about you. Researchers at Bath Spa University surveyed 1,000 dog owners, compiling data about the owners’ personality traits and their dogs’ breeds.

The researchers presented their findings to the British Psychological Society Annual Conference in 2012.

Stanley Coren, a psychologist and author of “Why We Love the dogs We Do,” also discussed the connection between owner personality traits and dog breeds, in an interview with Modern dog Magazine.

Read more: Dog Breeds: What Does Your Choice of Breed Say About You? » The Epoch Times

Listen to the Lovely Orchestra of Crickets Singing at Human Speed

19 November, 2013 at 12:24 | Posted in animals, Funny things :-), Music | 1 Comment

By Kate Rinsema

Want to hear something magical?

Experimental director and playwright, Robert Wilson, caught a hauntingly beautiful piece of music one night, a recording of crickets.

That part is common enough, but then he stretched out the sound as much as one would have to stretch the life of a cricket to equal that of a human, and the result is truly wonderful.


via Listen to the lovely orchestra of crickets singing at human speed [updated]

And here is a perhaps truer version:


via https://soundcloud.com/vcfxrecordings/crickets

A Guide to Cat Body Language

8 November, 2013 at 06:16 | Posted in Animal welfare, animals | Leave a comment


By Tara MacIsaac
Epoch Times

Cats communicate not only in purrs and growls but in many complex motions, using ears, eyes, tails, and body to express themselves. These expressions are often misunderstood. Here’s a guide to help you better understanding your cat.

Tail

Up: Happy and approachable
Down: Scared or threatened
Wagging rapidly: Agitated
Wagging slowly: Alert, assessing the situation
Stiff, up: Trying to appear larger, aggressive
Straight up and quivering: Excited. If your tom cat has not been neutered this gesture can also mean he is ready to spray.

Read more: A Guide to Cat Body Language

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How to Communicate With Your Dog

7 November, 2013 at 06:04 | Posted in Animal welfare, animals | Leave a comment

By Tara MacIsaac
Epoch Times

You may also see what Cesar Millan says about this. Please click on the image.

Though dogs may understand some human words, body language is their main form of communication. Not only is it how they tell you what they’re feeling, it is also the best way to communicate with them.

Here are some signs your dog may give you and how you can respond:

Stressed

Dogs may sweat through their paws when they are stressed. They may rapidly pant and lower the back end of their bodies with their tails down.

Calming signals: Dogs perform these actions as a way to calm themselves and others, but you can also imitate these actions to put a stressed dog at ease: yawn, look away, move slowly, appear to become distracted by something, sit. Dogs may also lick their lips or nose and lie down.

Read more: How to Communicate With Your Dog

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